Search Results for: Historical Chinatown Tours

Vancouver – Chinatown R-Evolution: Qingming Festival

The Qingming or Ching Ming Festival, also known as Tomb-Sweeping Day in English, is a traditional Chinese festival on the first day of the fifth solar term of the traditional Chinese luni solar calendar. This makes it the 15th day after the Spring Equinox, either 4 or 5 April in a given year. The Lee Association kindly gave me permission to photograph the day which included ceremonies in the Chinese section of Vancouver’s Mountain View Cemetary and in the Lee Association Clan House. This was followed by a banquet at a restaurant.                                                                                                                                       “The word “clan” has been used in the past to translate two Chinese words: zu and zongZu is narrower in meaning and refers to a family with unilineal descent and institutions such as ancestral halls, graveyards, and lands. Two or more zu with the same surname and linked by common, distant ancestor belong to the same zong. Overseas Chinese who shared the same surname – although not directly related – assumed that they may have had a common, remote ancestor, and that in the broad sense of the word (zong), they were clansmen to each other. The majority of Chinese immigrants in Canada belonged to a few large clans and shared a small pool of surnames. Clansmen formed clan and native-place (district) associations or huiguan, which flourished in early Chinatowns across Canada. These associations were based on models which the migrants were familiar with from China, and provided social services as well as opportunities to express cultural traditions. The associations also attempted to protect their members and negotiate on their behalf against discrimination and other problems. Chinese immigrants paid dues to their clan associations, and their counterpart clan associations, back in China, were notified that the dues had been paid.” Terms and Explanation Courtesy of  Vancouver Public Library

These images are part of Chinatown R-Evolution a photographic project on Vancouver’s Chinatown – This project received assistance from: Vancouver Foundation DTES Small Arts Grant  & Historical Chinatown Tours

– Tallulah

 

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Vancouver – Chinatown R-Evolution: The Chinese Tea Shop

The Chinese Tea Shop is located on the corner of Columbia & Pender Street, in the heart of Vancouver’s Chinatown. The shop sells very high quality teas, all sourced, tasted and approved by owner and tea master: Daniel Lui. If you want to taste tea before you buy it Daniel, prepares  “Gong-fu Cha,” a  ceremonial method of brewing and bringing out the flavours of the tea. On my last visit, Daniel started by choosing a 2003 pu-reh (tea cake) to brew.  A special knife is used to break the cake into small fragrant fragments, which will be brewed in a gentle manner which allows time for conversation. Arranging a specially chosen 200- year-old YIXING clay teapot, cups, tongs, and a strainer on a porous bamboo mat placed upon a wooden tray, the tea pot and cups are seasoned with hot water.  The first cup of tea of many cups of tea is ready to be drunk. Slurping is the best way to taste all the flavours of the tea and that manner is also effective in cooling the hot liquid.

Thank you to Mr Daniel Lui for his participation in this project.

These images are part of Chinatown R-Evolution a photographic project on Vancouver’s Chinatown – This project received assistance from: Vancouver Foundation DTES Small Arts Grant  & Historical Chinatown Tours

– Tallulah

The heart sutra is written on this 200-year-old YIXING clay teapot.

 

 

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Vancouver – Chinatown R-Evolution – DTES Small Arts Grants Group Show

Vancouver Foundation – DTES Small Arts Grants Group Show

Group Show Curator: Jen Castro

GROUP SHOW June 8 – July 14, 2017 Interurban Gallery 1 East Hastings (@Carrall) The land which this exhibition is being held  is the Unceded Coast Salish Territories of the Musqueam, Tsleil-Wauthuth and Squamish peoples.

Chinatown R-Evolution – Cut-ups
The cut-up technique, called découpé in French, is a literary system in which text is cut up and rearranged to create a new piece of prose. This concept, which can be traced to the Dadaist artists of the 1920s, was popularized in the 1950s and early 1960s by American writer and artist William S. Burroughs. The Cut-ups series takes random images from one country or project, then reassembles them into a final piece of artwork. These pieces give the viewer poetic insight into remote, exotic and mysterious worlds and cultures.

REFLECTIONS                                                                                                                                        Photographic C Print 24″ x 18″ –  Unframed $300, Framed $400

These images are part of Chinatown R-Evolution a photographic project on Vancouver’s Chinatown – This project received assistance from: Vancouver Foundation DTES Small Arts Grant  & Historical Chinatown Tours

– Tallulah

 

 

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Vancouver – Chinatown R-Evolution: Modernize Tailors

Modernize Tailors was opened in 1913 by Wong Kung Lai. His sons Bill and Jack Wong  took over the business and kept it going decades after other Chinatown tailors closed. The two brothers became Chinatown legends when, in the 1940’s, they were the go-to tailors for zoot suits – a man’s suit of an exaggerated style, characterized by a long loose jacket with padded shoulders and high-waisted tapering trousers, made popular in the 1940s and increasingly desired  by Vancouver’s teenagers.  I wonder when the last custom order for a zoot suit was? Over the years international film stars such as the dapper Sean Connery, local and loyal patrons frequented Modernize Tailors.

I had the chance to photograph Bill working at Modernize Tailors earlier this year and a quick peek into a storeroom full of vintage fabrics.

These images are part of Chinatown R-Evolution a photographic project on Vancouver’s Chinatown – This project received assistance from: Vancouver Foundation DTES Small Arts Grant  & Historical Chinatown Tours

– Tallulah

Sadly, both Jack (89) 2013 and Bill Wong (95) 2017 have passed away.

 

 

 

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