Vancouver – VIFW (Vancouver Indigenous Fashion Week)

Kinnie Starr performing at the VIFW

Vancouver Indigenous Fashion Week (VIFW) is a fashion show that promotes fashion and community. it connects the past, present and future of Canada. Indigenous designers such as Chief Janice George, Sho Sho Esquiro, Erin Brillion, Rob Geary to name a few showcased their designs at VIFW.  As an organisation VIFW, started by  Joleen Mitton, a former model herself works closely with the Pacific Association of First Nations Women’s Mentor Me program, which empowers Indigenous youth coming out of the foster care system. The runway models and production crew are recruited from the Mentor me program. 

Chief Janice George presented woven shawls and wraps on the last night of the VIFW. She cofounded the L’hen Awtxw Weaving House to share the teachings and pracitice of traditional Coast Salish wool weaving.

Street fashion by Rob Geary (SRO)

 

Vancouver – Research for WPP Eric Napoleon Campbell & Nuttin But Luv Club

Portrait of Eric Napoleon Campbell – Chapter President of Nuttin But Luv Club,  Vancouver 

When I come across someone who intrigues me and I want to feature them in the WPP the research and getting to know them can take some time, as they may have a life and culture that I know nothing about. I met Eric a few months ago at Trout Lake, he was with his family and their custom bikes, which are very eye catching and are inspired  by Chicano lowrider culture.  The above photo was taken at a lowrider event at Trev Deeley Motorcycles. I have been following and enjoying his photos on Instagram. Today I met him for a more formal interview and below are a few photos I took while we chatted. His life story is one of overcoming adversity and great personal change. Going forward his aim is to inspire his community (East Van) and to get kids off the streets by presenting a realistic alternative to joining gangs. He is chapter president of the Vancouver (only one in Canada) and sergeant-at-arms of the Nuttin But Luv Club, which was started in Pennsylvania, USA. In total there are 23 chapters, mostly in the USA, but  some are as far away as Germany, United Kingdom, Saudi Arabia and Australia.  From what I understand the Nuttin But Luv Club has a similar structure to a traditional motorcycle club but with zero tolerance for crime  or any destructive  behaviour and a very strong focus on positive attitudes.

Portrait of Eric Napoleon Campbell – Chapter President of Nuttin But Luv Club,  Vancouver

Portrait of Eric Napoleon Campbell – Chapter President of Nuttin But Luv Club,  Vancouver

Vancouver – Behind the Scenes of Kushe’s latest music video.

 
Some behind the scenes photographs of the filming of the music video for Kushe’s @yvonnekushe song Ngambira which means “Tell Me”. The song’s lyrics are sung in three languages Kushe’s mother tongue of Runyankole, Luganda and English. On location were the two amazing dancers and fashion designers:  Jason and Marisa @sleeplessmindz. All these photographs were taken in the vibrant V6A, my hood. 
I am looking forward to seeing the video directed by Qwisss which is due to be released the last week of November 2019. 
 
 
 

Vancouver – “You Always Hurt The Ones You Love”

This project is called “You Always Hurt The Ones You Love” –  a series of portraits of dolls taken on an analogue 4×5 view camera and a high-quality digital camera. The dolls will be old or used and collected from various sources such as thrift stores. The portrait session for the dolls will be similar to photographing a human with attention paid to lighting and backgrounds.  Once loved treasured and precious yet over the years often modified, such as cutting to their hair, drawing on them, reversing arms and other experiments. This leads us to the question what do dolls represent? Is it the pressure in society to be beautiful to fit in, do we control our own image? Presented as an exhibition this project aims to provoke the viewer to question their relationships to the past, to their own bodies the interplay of innocence and sexuality that is often represented in dolls made since the sixties. Are they a metaphor for a culture that’s still infinitely more preoccupied with a female’s appearance than her thinking?
 

Vancouver – Portraits Raziel Reid author of Kens

Portrait of author Raziel Reid, Vancouver, BC Canada
Portrait of author Raziel Reid, Vancouver, BC Canada
Portrait of author Raziel Reid, Vancouver, BC Canada

Vancouver – Hastings Park Racecourse

EMERGE FESTIVAL – GROUP ART EXHIBITION                                                              MAY 18-JUNE 16                                                                                                                  GALLERY CACHET

 

Hastings: the ride of a lifetime
26″ x 15″
$500.00
This image is part of Vancouver’s Hastings Park Racecourse a photographic project on the continuation of Vancouver’s vanishing urban culture – This project received assistance from Vancouver Foundation DTES Small Arts Grant  Thank you to all the staff at Pat Jarvis Racing Stables.
– Tallulah

Vancouver SQ by Tallulah

Choose from a selection of  8″ x 8″ prints – final matted size is 10.5″ x 10.5″  $85.00 each.                                                                                                                         All come with a certificate of authenticity.

 

 

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Vancouver – Chinatown R-Evolution: Qingming Festival

The Qingming or Ching Ming Festival, also known as Tomb-Sweeping Day in English, is a traditional Chinese festival on the first day of the fifth solar term of the traditional Chinese luni solar calendar. This makes it the 15th day after the Spring Equinox, either 4 or 5 April in a given year. The Lee Association kindly gave me permission to photograph the day which included ceremonies in the Chinese section of Vancouver’s Mountain View Cemetary and in the Lee Association Clan House. This was followed by a banquet at a restaurant.                                                                                                                                       “The word “clan” has been used in the past to translate two Chinese words: zu and zongZu is narrower in meaning and refers to a family with unilineal descent and institutions such as ancestral halls, graveyards, and lands. Two or more zu with the same surname and linked by common, distant ancestor belong to the same zong. Overseas Chinese who shared the same surname – although not directly related – assumed that they may have had a common, remote ancestor, and that in the broad sense of the word (zong), they were clansmen to each other. The majority of Chinese immigrants in Canada belonged to a few large clans and shared a small pool of surnames. Clansmen formed clan and native-place (district) associations or huiguan, which flourished in early Chinatowns across Canada. These associations were based on models which the migrants were familiar with from China, and provided social services as well as opportunities to express cultural traditions. The associations also attempted to protect their members and negotiate on their behalf against discrimination and other problems. Chinese immigrants paid dues to their clan associations, and their counterpart clan associations, back in China, were notified that the dues had been paid.” Terms and Explanation Courtesy of  Vancouver Public Library

These images are part of Chinatown R-Evolution a photographic project on Vancouver’s Chinatown – This project received assistance from: Vancouver Foundation DTES Small Arts Grant  & Historical Chinatown Tours

– Tallulah

 

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Vancouver – Chinatown R-Evolution: The Chinese Tea Shop

The Chinese Tea Shop is located on the corner of Columbia & Pender Street, in the heart of Vancouver’s Chinatown. The shop sells very high quality teas, all sourced, tasted and approved by owner and tea master: Daniel Lui. If you want to taste tea before you buy it Daniel, prepares  “Gong-fu Cha,” a  ceremonial method of brewing and bringing out the flavours of the tea. On my last visit, Daniel started by choosing a 2003 pu-reh (tea cake) to brew.  A special knife is used to break the cake into small fragrant fragments, which will be brewed in a gentle manner which allows time for conversation. Arranging a specially chosen 200- year-old YIXING clay teapot, cups, tongs, and a strainer on a porous bamboo mat placed upon a wooden tray, the tea pot and cups are seasoned with hot water.  The first cup of tea of many cups of tea is ready to be drunk. Slurping is the best way to taste all the flavours of the tea and that manner is also effective in cooling the hot liquid.

Thank you to Mr Daniel Lui for his participation in this project.

These images are part of Chinatown R-Evolution a photographic project on Vancouver’s Chinatown – This project received assistance from: Vancouver Foundation DTES Small Arts Grant  & Historical Chinatown Tours

– Tallulah

The heart sutra is written on this 200-year-old YIXING clay teapot.

 

 

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Vancouver – Chinatown R-Evolution – DTES Small Arts Grants Group Show

Vancouver Foundation – DTES Small Arts Grants Group Show

Group Show Curator: Jen Castro

GROUP SHOW June 8 – July 14, 2017 Interurban Gallery 1 East Hastings (@Carrall) The land which this exhibition is being held  is the Unceded Coast Salish Territories of the Musqueam, Tsleil-Wauthuth and Squamish peoples.

Chinatown R-Evolution – Cut-ups
The cut-up technique, called découpé in French, is a literary system in which text is cut up and rearranged to create a new piece of prose. This concept, which can be traced to the Dadaist artists of the 1920s, was popularized in the 1950s and early 1960s by American writer and artist William S. Burroughs. The Cut-ups series takes random images from one country or project, then reassembles them into a final piece of artwork. These pieces give the viewer poetic insight into remote, exotic and mysterious worlds and cultures.

REFLECTIONS                                                                                                                                        Photographic C Print 24″ x 18″ –  Unframed $300, Framed $400

These images are part of Chinatown R-Evolution a photographic project on Vancouver’s Chinatown – This project received assistance from: Vancouver Foundation DTES Small Arts Grant  & Historical Chinatown Tours

– Tallulah

 

 

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